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Kamailio Voice over IP

Kamailio Bytes – OnReply Route

So far with most of our discussions about Kamailio we’ve talked about routing the initial SIP request (INVITE, REGISTER, SUBSCRIBE, etc), but SIP is not a one-message protocol, there’s a whole series of SIP messages that go into a SIP Dialog.

Sure the call may start with an INVITE, but there’s the 180 RINGING, the 200 OK and the ACK that go into getting the call actually established, and routing these in-dialog messages is just as important as routing the first INVITE.

When we’ve talked about SIP routing it’s all happened in the request_route {} block:

request_route {
        xlog("Received $rm to $ru - Forwarding");
        append_hf("X-Proxied: You betcha\r\n");
        #Forward to new IP
        forward("192.168.1.110");
}

In the example above we statelessly forward any initial requests to the IP 192.168.1.110.

All the routing from that point on happens using the standard RFC3261 in-dialog routing using the Route headers.

We can add an onreply_route{} block to handle any replies from 192.168.1.110 back to the originator.

But why would we want to?

Some simple answers would be to do some kind of manipulation to the message – say to strip a Caller ID if CLIP is turned off, or to add a custom SIP header containing important information, etc.

onreply_route{
        xlog("Got a reply $rs");
        append_hf("X-Proxied: For the reply\r\n");
}

Let’s imagine a scenario where the destination our SIP proxy is relaying traffic to (192.168.1.110) starts responding with 404 error.

We could detect this in our onreply_route{} and do something about it.

onreply_route{
        xlog("Got a reply $rs");
        if($rs == 404) {
                #If remote destination returns 404
                xlog("Got a 404 for $rU");
                #Do something about it
        }
}

In the 404 example if we were using Dispatcher it’s got easily accessed logic to handle these scenarios a bit better than us writing it out here, but you get the idea.

There are a few other special routes like onreply_route{}, failure routes and event routes, etc.

Hopefully now you’ll have a better idea of how and when to use onreply_route{} in Kamailio.

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