Categories
GSM LTE Mobile Networks Security SIM Cards

SIM / Smart Card Deep Dive – Part 3 – APDUs and Hello Card

A look at APDUs and Interacting with Cards

In our last post we covered the file system structure of a smart card and the basic concepts of communication with cards. In this post we’ll look at what happens on the application layer, and how to interact with a card.

For these examples I’ll be using SIM cards, because admit it, you’ve already got a pile sitting in a draw, and this is a telco blog after all. You won’t need the ADM keys for the cards, we’ll modify files we’ve got write access to by default.

Commands & Instructions

So to do anything useful with the card we need issue commands / instructions to the card, to tell it to do things. Instructions like select this file, read it’s contents, update the contents to something else, verify my PIN, authenticate to the network, etc.

The term Command and Instruction are used somewhat interchangeably in the spec, I realise that I’ve done the same here to make it just as confusing, but instruction means the name of the specific command to be called, and command typically means the APDU as a whole.

The “Generic Commands” section of 3GPP TS 31.101 specifies the common commands, so let’s take a look at one.

The creatively named SELECT command/instruction is used to select the file we want to work with. In the SELECT command we’ll include some parameters, like where to find the file, so some parameters are passed with the SELECT Instruction to limit the file selection to a specific area, etc, the length of the file identifier to come, and the identifier of the file.

The card responds with a Status Word, returned by the card, to indicate if it was successful. For example if we selected a file that existed and we had permission to select, we’d get back a status word indicating the card had successfully selected the file. Status Words are 2 byte responses that indicate if the instruction was successful, but also the card has data it wants to send to the terminal as a result of the instruction, how much data the terminal should expect.

So if we just run a SELECT command, telling the card to select a file, we’ll get back a successful response from the card with a data length. Next need to get that data from the card. As the card can’t initiate communication, the GET RESPONSE instruction is sent to the card to get the data from the card, along with the length of the data to be returned.

The GET RESPONSE instruction/command is answered by the card with an APDU containing the data the card has to send, and the last 2 bytes contain the Status Word indicating if it was successful or not.

APDUs

So having covered the physical and link layers, we now move onto the Application Layer – where the magic happens.

Smart card communications is strictly master-slave based when it comes to the application layer.

The terminal sends a command to the card, which in turn sends back a response. Command -> Response, Command -> Response, over and over.

These commands are contained inside APplication Data Units (APDUs).

So let’s break down a simple APDU as it appears on the wire, so to speak.

The first byte of our command APDU is taken up with a header called the class byte, abbreviated to CLA. This specifies class coding, secure messaging options and channel options.

In the next byte we specify the Instruction for the command, that’s the task / operation we want the card to perform, in the spec this is abbreviated to INS.

The next two bytes, called P1 & P2 (Parameter 1 & Parameter 2) specify the parameters of how the instruction is to be to be used.

Next comes Lc – Length of Command, which specifies the length of the command data to follow,

Data comes next, this is instruction data of the length specified in Lc.

Finally an optional Le – Length of expected response can be added to specify how long the response from the card should be.

Crafting APDUs

So let’s encode our own APDU to send to a card, for this example we’ll create the APDU to tell the card to select the Master File (MF) – akin to moving to the root directory on a *nix OS.

For this we’ll want a copy of ETSI TS 102 221 – the catchily named “Smart cards; UICC-Terminal interface; Physical and logical characteristics” which will guide in the specifics of how to format the command, because all the commands are encoded in hexadecimal format.

So here’s the coding for a SELECT command from section 11.1.1.1 “SELECT“,

Image

For the CLA byte in our example we’ll indicate in our header that we’re using ISO 7816-4 encoding, with nothing fancy, which is denoted by the byte A0.

For the next but we’ve got INS (Instruction) which needs to be set to the hex value for SELECT, which is represented by the hex value A4, so our second byte will have that as it’s value.

The next byte is P1, which specifies “Selection Control”, the table in the specification outlines all the possible options, but we’ll use 00 as our value, meaning we’ll “Select DF, EF or MF by file id”.

The next byte P2 specifies more selection options, we’ll use “First or only occurrence” which is represented by 00.

The Lc byte defines the length of the data (file id) we’re going to give in the subsequent bytes, we’ve got a two byte File ID so we’ll specify 2 (represented by 02).

Finally we have the Data field, where we specify the file ID we want to select, for the example we’ll select the Master File (MF) which has the file ID ‘3F00‘, so that’s the hex value we’ll use.

So let’s break this down;

CodeMeaningValue
CLAClass bytes – Coding optionsA0 (ISO 7816-4 coding)
INSInstruction (Command) to be calledA4 (SELECT)
P1Parameter 1 – Selection Control (Limit search options)00 (Select by File ID)
P2Parameter 1 – More selection options00 (First occurrence)
LcLength of Data 02 (2 bytes of data to come)
DataFile ID of the file to Select3F00 (File ID of master file)

So that’s our APDU encoded, it’s final value will be A0 A4 00 00 02 3F00

Image
Wireshark trace of sending this APDU

So there we have it, a valid APDU to select the Master File.

In the next post we’ll put all this theory into practice and start interacting with a real life SIM cards using PySIM, and take a look at the APDUs with Wireshark.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *